Government Invests in Dartmouth Food and Family Centres

The Dartmouth Family Centre will soon be located next to the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre, allowing more people to access family programs and healthy eating.

Premier Stephen McNeil visited the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre today, Sept. 24, to announce that government will invest $100,000 to help staff and volunteers offer combined programming out of a central location.

“We are committed to creating a healthier province and reducing barriers for Nova Scotians to access the services they need,” said Premier McNeil. “This is an important investment in the Dartmouth community and will help ensure families are supported.”

The Dartmouth Family Centre offers parenting and family supports to children and families, but its current location is not accessible for persons with disabilities. Funding will go toward renovating a new space that is fully accessible to all. This includes ensuring the new location is wheelchair accessible and stroller friendly.

The Dartmouth North Community Food Centre features an urban farm and hosts free community meals for people of all ages, as well as programs to support healthy eating.

Diana shares her families’ story. From right to left: Diana, Dezmond, Kwame, and Andrea

Diana shares her families’ story. From right to left: Diana, Dezmond, Kwame, and Andrea

Premier McNeil talks about the importance of the Food and Family Centres for Dartmouth North, but also the province as a whole.

Premier McNeil talks about the importance of the Food and Family Centres for Dartmouth North, but also the province as a whole.

Diana poses with Premier McNeil after the big announcement.

Diana poses with Premier McNeil after the big announcement.

From right to left: Premier McNeil, Danny Chedrawe, Executive Director Wendy Fraser, Councillor Tony Mancini.

From right to left: Premier McNeil, Danny Chedrawe, Executive Director Wendy Fraser, Councillor Tony Mancini.

Quotes:

Nova Scotia is at its best when everyone has an opportunity to participate. Having the Dartmouth Family Centre and the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre in one accessible location means more people can connect to important services in their community barrier free. Kelly Regan, Minister of Community Services

Creating a new Family Centre will make our services more accessible to families in Dartmouth North and will create important opportunities for us to integrate and expand our programs. We are grateful that the Province of Nova Scotia is making this significant investment in our community.Wendy Fraser, executive director, Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre

My kids and I are starting over. But I worry a bit less and smile a bit more because I have a constant through all of it and that is the support of the family centre. I’m so happy that the Dartmouth Family Centre and Dartmouth North Community Food Centre are going to be under one roof and offering more services to the community.Diana Franklin, participant, Dartmouth Family Centre

Quick Facts:

  • the Departments of Community Services and Communities, Culture and Heritage will each contribute $50,000 toward the centre’s $500,000 capital campaign

  • the location of the new, integrated site will be at 6 Primrose St., Dartmouth, at the current location of the Food Centre

  • in 2018-19, the Department of Community Services provided over $290,000 to support the Dartmouth Family Centre’s core work and over $110,00 for the Parenting Journey, a home-based visitation program

  • the Dartmouth North Family Centre is celebrating 25 years of service this year

  • funding aligns with Nova Scotia’s Culture Action Plan, supports the goals of SHIFT, Nova Scotia’s Action Plan for an Aging Population and supports government’s commitment to persons with disabilities

Additional Resources:

Culture Action Plan: https://novascotia.ca/culture/

SHIFT: Nova Scotia’s Action Plan for an Aging population: https://novascotia.ca/shift/

IKEA donates a new ‘community living room’ for Dartmouth North

Imagine hosting 5,372 people and 1,944 children in your living room every year!

That’s how many people the Dartmouth Family Centre drop-in room sees annually, so it’s no wonder that the furniture has taken quite a beating.

Now, thanks to IKEA in Dartmouth Crossing, families and individual visitors will have access to comfortable new furniture, exciting new toys and innovative storage solutions.

“IKEA is contributing $2,500 in merchandise to this critical space for families and individuals and we are very grateful for their support,” said Wendy Fraser, Executive Director of Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre.

A stack of gifts! Thank you to IKEA for not only giving our drop-in room a make over, but also for helping us put everything together!

A stack of gifts! Thank you to IKEA for not only giving our drop-in room a make over, but also for helping us put everything together!

Maria (Early Childhood Educator) holds up some of the new toys that will be used to spark imagination in Child Development.

Maria (Early Childhood Educator) holds up some of the new toys that will be used to spark imagination in Child Development.

Pizza anyone? One of the adorable new additions to our play kitchen!

Pizza anyone? One of the adorable new additions to our play kitchen!

The drop-in room is a comfortable space with sofas, toys and books, where parents and children can socialize and play together and interact with staff to access informal support on a variety of parenting-related or personal issues and topics.

This space also provides access to practical daily supports, from bread delivered by Feed Nova Scotia and a trading cupboard with food staples and toiletries, to wifi, fax and photocopy services for people in the broader community.

“We are proud to partner with Dartmouth Family Centre in creating a warm and welcoming space for community members to connect and access important services,” said IKEA Halifax Store Manager Sue Coulet. “IKEA strives to support our community and positively impact the lives of children and families.”

 IKEA delivered the donation directly to the Family Centre and brought a team of volunteers to set up the new items.

Thank you to our neighbours at IKEA!

The IKEA team with our Director of Partnerships, Anne-Marie, and our Executive Director Wendy, all on our brand new couch! Thank you!

The IKEA team with our Director of Partnerships, Anne-Marie, and our Executive Director Wendy, all on our brand new couch! Thank you!

Drop-in Community Kitchen: Weekly Food Demos

Every Friday after the affordable Good Food Market & Cafe, community members are invited to stay and participate in a food demonstration, a drop-in program where they can watch a new recipe take shape from start to finish.

Last week supporters from Medavie came and helped with the Food Demo. Medavie has generously supported the Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre since 2016 and just announced a further $120,000 in funding for Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre over the next three years.

Last week supporters from Medavie came and helped with the Food Demo. Medavie has generously supported the Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre since 2016 and just announced a further $120,000 in funding for Dartmouth Family Centre/Dartmouth North Community Food Centre over the next three years.

Every week Food Skills Coordinator Melissa Rankin prepares a new recipe like chickpea hummus or homemade sauerkraut and walks through making the dish step-by-step. The recipes usually contain an in-season vegetable or ingredient, often from the market or the Community Food Centre’s very own on-site community farm. At the end of the food demo, everyone gets a sample of the dish to taste.

While it sounds simple, the food demos have a profound impact, because of their accessibility. Because 83% of participants at the Food Centre are living below the poverty line and 76% have one or more chronic illnesses, there isn’t always an opportunity to learn positive food skills.

And the food demos are not only a spectator experience. Participants are able to ask all kinds of questions as the disk is being prepared. “People ask about adapting the recipe, clarification on how to do something, ideas on substitutions, and nutrition information,” says Melissa. And so, the food demos go a long way to helping people build food literacy.

“People might have access to a recipe, but if they don’t know how to interpret it, or what it means to do things like ‘dice an onion’, then they will get stuck,” explains Melissa Rankin. “Through the food demos, I can explain what certain words mean, why certains steps are really important in a recipe, people can ask questions, and these things that are really important for building people’s food skills.”

And food demos can be a stepping stone to so much more, acting as an important entry point for other programming at the Food Centre, or reaching out to volunteers and staff. Each food demo is accessible and low-impact for people who are shy or have social anxiety. In 2018, the Food Centre saw almost 2,000 visits to community kitchen programs, with food demos often being the first that new participants attend.

 “Melissa [the program coordinator] is so kind, and she is good at explaining things,” said one participant. Another said that they “really enjoy the Food Demos, and always try the recipe at home.”

“The food demos help people try new foods.” explains Deborah Dickey, Community Food Centre manager, “If you don’t have a lot of money, why would you take the risk to buy something new that you or kids might not like or know how to cook? But it is really important that people try new things, because having a diversity of foods in your diet is key for overall health.”

Interested in attending a food demo? Drop into the Community Food Centre at 12:15pm on Fridays after the Good Food Market & Cafe. Check out the monthly calendar for more info on scheduling.